Last edited by Turan
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Mature students in higher education found in the catalog.

Mature students in higher education

John C. Horobin

Mature students in higher education

by John C. Horobin

  • 371 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Scottish Institute of Adult and Continuing Education in Edinburgh .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Adult education -- Research -- Scotland.,
  • Education, Higher -- Research -- Scotland.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementsummary of a review prepared for the Scottish Education Department by John C. Horobin.
    SeriesScottish adult education research monographs -- no. 4
    ContributionsGreat Britain. Scottish Education Dept., Scottish Institute of Adult and Continuing Education., Universities Council of Adult and Continuing Education (Scotland)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination17 p. --
    Number of Pages17
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18452621M
    ISBN 100903647168

    Student-Centered Learning in Higher Education The objective of Weimer’s book against students becoming successful, mature learners. She says that many instructors recognize this and try to make changes in the direction of more student-centeredness, even though their level of.   The , mature students represent an increase of 6% on last year. This is the highest number recorded at one week after A level results day. Acceptances from those aged are up 5% for the UK, with increases in all four UK countries.

      Analysis of Trends in Higher Education Applications, Admissions, and Enrolments says that enrolments for part-time mature students are down 43 per cent on , a drop of , students. This is compared with a fall of 13 per cent for full timers aged 25 and over in the same period.   Decline in part-time and mature student numbers revealed in access to higher education report ‘a scandal’ Head of UCU says ‘rapid’ drop points to a ‘failure of the student finance system.

    Studies in Higher Education, 1, 2, , Oct 76 The prevalence of mature students, those aged 25 and over, on a British campus and its implications for the college are discussed. Mature students tend to be conscious to a greater degree than younger ones of certain aspects of Cited by: Mature students. Foundation Year STEM Studies – an Increasingly Important Part of Higher Education. Broadening the scope for outreach to include adult learners as well as 18 year olds.


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Mature students in higher education by John C. Horobin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Gallacher, A. & Locke, M. () Mature Students in Higher Education: How Institutions Can Learn From Experience. Centre for Institutional Studies. University of East : David Wray.

The Mature Student's Guide to Higher Education tells you everything you need to know if you are thinking about returning to education as a mature student. It discusses a wide range of issues including what higher education involves, how you should prepare for it and how to balance your time and cheque book once you get there.

Proposed campus aims to pull in students from areas where only % of school leavers go on to higher education Clearing Mature students who embrace the joy of being a.

The Mature Student's Guide to Higher Education tells you everything you need to know if you are thinking about returning to education as a mature student. It discusses a wide range of issues including what higher education involves, how you should prepare for it and how to balance your time and cheque book once you get there.4/5(1).

Although mature students are often said to be deficient in study skills, most research into approaches to studying in higher education has ignored age as an important explanatory variable.

There is nevertheless a consistent suggestion in research using inventories and questionnaires on study processes that mature students exhibit more desirable Cited by:   As an older student you definitely appreciate the education more.

Young people often feel pressured to go to university by their teachers or parents – as a mature student, you’re there because Author: Charlotte Seager. Mature students are sometimes said to be deficient in the basic skills needed for effective studying in higher education or to be impaired by age-related intellectual deficits.

However, the research literature on the academic performance of mature students contains no good evidence that mature students perform any less well than younger students on courses Cited by: Tertiary students include those studying at university or TAFE.

Returning to study or starting tertiary study as a mature age student can be challenging. However, most mature age students enjoy the learning experience and do equally as well as other students.

Mature age students are usually highly motivated and keen to do well. Returning to education is likely to cause challenges for mature students: picking up studies after a break, integrating with young students with different life experiences, and coping with financial problems are just a few of the difficulties.

Universities should be aware of this and offer the support to maintain their participation in higher. The defining feature which categorises mature students is based on age but this can vary on the country in question, for example, in Sweden, Norway and Australia the mature student is classified as someone who is over twenty-five years of age (Thomas and Quinn, ) as opposed to the UK where according to the Higher Education Statistics.

Get this from a library. Mature students, entry to higher education: a guide for students and advisers. [Judith Bell; Shiela Hamilton; Gordon Wynne Roderick]. body and mature participation in higher education is vital for individuals, universities and society as a whole.

For individual mature students, going to university for. This book explores the unique set of challenges faced by mature-age male undergraduates as they adapt to university study. The authors examine the motivations of mature male students for enrolling in higher education and their aspirations for life after graduation, in doing so filling a crucial gap in the current literature.

Learning Support: A Guide for Mature Students distils the talents, skills and perceptions that lead to success and to make them available to the general adult learning population at all levels - for people taking in evening classes at municipal adult education centres, returning to further education or embarking on higher education for the.

Higher education is an important stepping stone for millions of people around the world. It not only helps people grow as individuals and learn more about the world at large and the people around them, but college also helps people learn trades and develop skills needed in the career world.

The term ‘mature student’ is usually used when referring to anyone going to university or college after a period of time out of full-time education. Typically, this will mean students who are over 21 years of age at the beginning of their undergraduate studies, or over 25 years of age at the beginning of their postgraduate studies.

Mature students in higher education: III. Approaches to studying in access students. Studies in Higher Education: Vol. 22, No. 1, pp.

Cited by: and that this could disadvantage mature students. Members of the stakeholder group felt that the University of Bristol’s image and some of its admissions mechanisms are more geared towards conventionally academic students who have taken a traditional route into higher education.

This may create barriers for mature students, who are more likely toFile Size: KB. entering Higher Education Institutions (HEI) highlights the relevance of questioning on mature students’ academic success.

Thus, the purpose of this study is to characterise mature students over 23 years old (MS23) of two Portuguese HEI, and understand their academic success. The study focuses on results obtained through a case study, based on. Buy The Mature Student's Handbook (Macmillan Study Skills) by Becker, Lucinda (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low /5(14). University as a mature student: top tips Age really is just a number when it comes to higher education, with significant numbers of mature students going to university beyond the age of 21, says. The data presented in this paper is taken fromthe results of two much larger studies ofmature student decision-making and HigherEducation (HE), which considerprocesses of agency from initial considerationof the possibility of becoming a studentto eventually becoming one.

In thispaper, six categories of applicant to HE arediscussed: • `Delayed traditional Cited by: Adult students are frequently referred to as nontraditional students in higher education. Adult students are contrasted with traditional students, who are typically un attend full-time, do not work full-time when enrolled in courses, and have few, if any, family responsibilities.

In36 percent of postsecondary students were age